Why Do You Need A Complex Solution To A Problem When A Simple One Will Fix It?

Why Do You Need A Complex Solution To A Problem When A Simple One Will Fix It?

As a Professional Speaker and Corporate Trainer I get the chance to observe many massive changes in peoples productivity and workflow. However, I am always amazed at what people do when they are given a fix, solution and answer to a problem.

In the spirit of full transparency. I am a reformed control freak and over-thinker. Fixing these issues gives me some license to write and speak about my observations below. My hope is to offer you some solace from the bondage of being an overthinking control freak and implement simple solutions.

No doubt many problems are complex, multi-layered and bothersome. However, I have discovered over the past 23 years of working in this industry that no matter the complexity of the problem almost all of the solutions to the problems are simple. It’s as simple as don’t do that. Start doing this… Just as the famous quote says “just do it” but they don’t. When I sense that the (easy) solution is not going to be implemented that second I explore why?

How to implement a simple fix to a complex problem requires a few things. First, determining if you can control it and making it hard to screw up the solution.

One of the most common obstacles in implementing a simple solution is trying to control things we can’t. He’s a little help.

Running things through the control decision filter looks like this.

As you can see running these through the decision filter you get two possible outcomes. Let it go or do something about it. If social media is disruptive to you or chews up a ton of your time then delete the social media account offenders. If you are worrying about what other people think. Let it go – you cannot control third parties and people. Ruminating and overthinking. Again, through the filter it goes. It you say I can do this and handle it, then do it now. If you can control it – let is go now!

Simple right?

It is. That’s all there is to it. Another common obstacles in adopting a simple solution is wanting a complex and dense solution.

We discount solutions that lack complexity and density. I’ve found that sometimes it’s that people want to be beautiful unique snowflakes and a simple fix is to general for them. They need the density of a solution to un pack to make them feel special. You want to feel special rescue a dog from the shelter and watch how they treat you when you come home from a long day at work. There… you’re special. Feel it?

Make it hard to mess up and simple fix.

Some fixes require friction or self-imposed barriers to carry out the solution. Friction makes it hard to screw up a simple solution. You identify you have a slight peanut butter overconsumption problem. The massive amounts of nut butter you shovel down your gullet is making you fat. Hmmmmm what do you do? I’d say, don’t buy any more peanut butter and delete the @I ❤️ peanut butter account from your Instagram app (self-imposed barrier). Problem solved. You say, no my kids need peanut butter for their school lunches. I understand. Then buy it and have them hide it (friction). Every morning when you get ready to make their lunches they bring it to you. After you make the lunches they hide it again.

Now, you try it.

Take a problem run it through the decision filter. If you can’t control it then let it go. If you can control it. Look for a solution and implement it now. Apply a self-imposed barrier or friction. There you go. All better.

Published by Eric Herdman

Eric Herdman is an accomplished speaker, business leader, coach and facilitator, who has been speaking professionally in-person for almost 3 decades and as a virtual presenter for nearly 4 years. During his presentations Eric will entertain, inform, educate, and engage your audiences into action. Herdman is an innovator in helping others grow. Working with audiences and individuals and building his speaking business have been at the core of what Eric does, since he started speaking professionally in 1996. Eric has also experienced the start-up and development side of business when in late 2004, he raised the $1,000,000 necessary to open a startup called “Red Rock Running Company.” He grew the business into one of the largest specialty retailers in the southwestern United States market, with exponential growth. Eric is dedicated to orchestrating know-how. As a business owner and leader, his staff was trained and empowered to make decisions and deliver an excellent customer experience. His innovative advertising and social media networking efforts exposed niches for growing his customer base and filling their needs. As an International Professional Speaker, Eric’s clients include one of the world's largest franchise health club chains. He is well-known for his know-how in servicing customers and training staff and helped them reach a $20,000 increase in revenue in the first month of using his strategy. He works with a variety of clients from multibillion-dollar pharmaceutical companies to top financial institutions to national associations and government agencies. Eric has published several books including “Actions Speak Louder Than Words,” and “The Complete Guide to Managing Everything, Everyone and Every Task.” Most recently, Eric’s “Time, Energy, and Focus” book has been expanded online as a Masterclass. For over 38 years Eric has walked the talk as a competitive ultra-endurance athlete, competing in 103 triathlons, 6 marathons and 35 ultra marathons. Eric holds the 12-hour course record at both “Flatlanders” race and “Race Against the Clock” as well as the 50-mile course record in the “Valley of Fire” race. He has also competed in many 24 hour races, including the "Ultimate Treadmill Challenge" where he raced for 24 hours on a treadmill. Whether you’re looking to strategically position your business, get more from your team, or get into shape, Herdman has the style and leadership to help you and your team achieve top-level success. For more on Eric’s programs email or text us at 702-805-4805.

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